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Visiting Campus

Campus visits provide meaningful opportunities to meet faculty, staff and students in your program of interest, and it will give you the chance to take in the full Mizzou experience.

Visit your program of interest

We recommend that you contact the director of graduate studies in the academic program you’re considering to set up a visit. Directors are faculty members appointed for each program on campus. Meeting with prospective students is their duty. Try to make appointments at least two weeks in advance.

Prospective students from underrepresented minority groups can apply for the Emerge Graduate Preview Weekend, an expenses-paid event in the fall.

If you have general questions about visiting campus, please refer to the university's visitors guide.

Visit checklist

  • First, review this list of considerations to prioritize your interests and needs.
  • Create a list of questions you want to ask. About.com has an informative section on graduate school that includes a list of questions you should consider asking. Research your program of interest before you get to campus to maximize your time.
  • Meet with faculty. If you would like to conduct research with a specific faculty member, you can contact him/her directly before to set up an appointment. Our Academic Programs Catalog provides faculty lists with research areas of interest.
  • Ask about opportunities to meet with students. Talk to the director of graduate studies about whether current students have been appointed to meet with visitors like you.
  • Think about areas of campus you'd like to investigate. Official campus tours include lots of information specific to undergraduates, so it might be better to ask the director of graduate studies whether current students or staff from the program have been appointed to give graduate tours. You can also print a campus map or take a virtual tour, where you can explore campus at your pace or take a guided video tour.
  • Explore life in Columbia. Learn more about why so many people and national publications rate Columbia as one of the top places to live.